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  >    >  Introduction to Biology — Open & Free

Introduction to Biology — Open & Free

An approach to Biology that helps students understand themselves and their environment.
Learn about Open & Free OLI courses by visiting the “Open & Free features” tab below.

Description

This introductory course defines biology and its relationship to other sciences. We examine the overarching theories of life from biological research and also explore the fundamental concepts and principles of the study of living organisms and their interaction with the environment. We will examine how life is organized into hierarchical levels; how living organisms use and produce energy; how life grows, develops, and reproduces; how life responds to the environment to maintain internal stability; and how life evolves and adapts to the environment.

This course is a part of our Community College (CC-OLI) series. Courses in this series are particularly well-suited to the needs of introductory community college courses, but are open for use by any instructor or student.

Topics Covered:
  • Recurrent Themes in Biology
  • The Method of Scientific Inquiry
  • Introductions to
    • Biological Chemistry
    • Organic Molecules
    • Cell Theory
    • Metabolism
    • Genetics
    • Ecology
    • Evolution

Open & Free features

Open & Free Courses

Freeforever
  • Open & Free OLI courses enable independent learners to study a subject on their own terms, at their leisure. Courses are:

    • Self-guided.
    • Self-paced.
    • Self-supported.
  • Open & Free courses include only the learning materials:

    • No teacher.
    • No tests.
    • No college credit.
    • No certificate of completion.
  • *If your teacher gave you a Course Key, do not use an Open & Free course because your teacher will never see your work.

What students will learn

By the time they finish this course, students will learn or be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles of biology by systematically exploring the following characteristics of life:

  1. Life is organized into hierarchical levels.
  2. Life maintains internal stability through a process called homeostasis.
  3. Life requires energy.
  4. Life grows, develops, and reproduces.
  5. Life evolves.
  6. Life is interdependent.

Learning objectives by module

Unit 1: Biology: The Science of Life

Module 2: Introduction to Biology

  • Define and identify emergent properties.
  • Define biology.
  • Describe and identify the levels of biological organization from molecules to the biosphere, noting the interrelationships between levels.
  • Determine whether or not viruses are alive.
  • List the characteristics of life and apply them to identify an item as biotic (living) or abiotic (nonliving).

 

Module 3: Themes in Biology

  • Compare and contrast the way energy and matter move through living systems.
  • Define energy and matter and be able to identify substances as one or the other.
  • Define evolution.
  • Define homeostasis and explain its role in maintaining life.
  • Explain how different parts of living systems rely on each other for survival.
  • Explain the relationship between structure and function in biology.
  • Identify the overarching/recurring themes in biology and explain how they relate to the goals of this course.
  • Outline the processes of reproduction and growth, identifying the role of DNA in each.
  • Relate the concept of inheritance to the unity of life and describe the process of natural selection, predicting its outcome for a simple example.

 

Module 4: Scientific Inquiry

  • Apply an understanding of the nature of science to identify scientific and nonscientific claims.
  • Define the term “significant” when used to describe the results of a scientific experiment.
  • Describe the control group and experimental group in a controlled experiment.
  • Explain how science uses the method of reproducible experiments and verifiable observations to understand the physical world.
  • Identify and distinguish between the independent variable, the dependent variable, and standardized variables in a controlled experiment.
  • Identify legitimate hypotheses based on whether or not they are testable and falsifiable.
  • Relate biology to other scientific endeavors.
  • State a reasonable definition of “science” in your own words.

 

Unit 2: Introduction to Chemistry

Module 7: Atoms

  • Apply your understanding of atomic structure to the function of radioactive isotopes used in medical imaging.
  • Define the three subatomic particles, their charge, and where they reside in the atom.
  • Describe the basic structure of the atom.
  • Describe the charge and location of an electron in an atom.
  • Distinguish between atomic number and atomic mass.
  • Distinguish between atoms and elements.
  • Relate different isotopes of the same element to the atomic mass number for the element.

 

Module 8: Chemical Bonds

  • Define and describe covalent bonds.
  • Define and describe hydrogen bonds.
  • Define and describe ionic bonds.
  • Describe chemical bonding and the role of electrons.
  • Interpret drawings (structural and skeletal formulae) of molecules and identify all atoms and covalent bonds in such drawings.
  • Predict the correct partial charges on bonded atoms, given the electronegativity of the two atoms.

 

Module 9: Water

  • Explain why water’s properties are important for living things.
  • List the four properties of water and describe each property.
  • Predict whether or not a substance can be used as a detergent based on its chemical structure.
  • Recognize key functional groups and predict whether compounds will be hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or amphipathic.

 

Module 10: Acids and Bases

  • Categorize a substance as acidic, basic, or neutral based on the pH of the solution.
  • Define pH.
  • Describe the role of acids, bases, and buffers in living systems.
  • Determine the pH of various everyday solutions.
  • Interpret the results when different solutions are tested with red and blue litmus paper.
  • Predict the outcome of a neutralization reaction.
  • Predict the pH of a substance based on its hydrogen ion concentration.
  • Use relative hydrogen ion concentrations in solutions to determine whether a solution is an acid, a base, or neutral.

 

Unit 3: Biological Macromolecules

Module 13: Introduction to Organic Molecules

  • Identify a molecule as organic or inorganic.
  • Identify the reason organic molecules are diverse and durable.
  • Identify the structure of an organic molecule based on a chemical drawing.
  • List the four major categories of biological macromolecules and their monomers.
  • List the four major characteristics of organic molecules.
  • Recognize key functional groups and predict whether compounds will be hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or amphipathic.
  • Select the correct chemical drawing based on the 3D structure.

 

Module 14: Carbohydrates

  • Apply your understanding of carbohydrates to address dietary issues.
  • Compare the structures of types of carbohydrate molecules.
  • Describe how the structure of carbohydrate molecules affects function.
  • Explain features that are characteristic of a carbohydrate.

 

Module 15: Lipids

  • Compare and contrast saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.
  • Describe how phospholipids respond when immersed in water.
  • Describe the health risk associated with trans fats.
  • Describe the importance of steroids to human nutrition.
  • Describe the structure of a trans fat.
  • Distinguish between the molecular structures of the different types of lipids.
  • Explain features that are characteristic of a lipid.
  • Identify the function of steroids.
  • Identify the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of a phospholipid.
  • Relate differences in macromolecular structure with differences in function.

 

Module 16: Proteins

  • Associate biological functions with proteins.
  • Describe chemical changes during peptide bond formation.
  • Describe structural changes during protein denaturation.
  • Determine the consequences of an enzyme malfunction.
  • Distinguish between proteins and enzymes.
  • Identify the peptide bonds in strings of amino acids.
  • Predict the effect of changing the activation energy on the rate of a reaction.
  • Predict the effect of the environment on the activity of enzymes.
  • Predict the substrate that will bind to a ligand, based on complementarity between the binding site and ligand.
  • Predict whether an amino acid is hydrophobic or hydrophilic based on its side chain.
  • Recognize the common chemical structure of amino acids.
  • Using the relationship between sequence and structure, predict how a protein will fold, based on the hydrophobic effect.

 

Module 17: Nucleic Acids

  • Calculate the mass of ATP needed to fuel a single day’s activities.
  • Describe the key features of molecular structure of DNA.
  • Describe the structure and function of ATP.
  • Describe the structure of a generic nucleotide.
  • Distinguish between purines and pyrimidines.
  • Distinguish RNA from DNA based on the molecular structure.
  • Identify the 5’ and 3’ ends of a nucleic acid.
  • Relate molecular interactions between the components of nucleic acids to the stability of the double helix structure of DNA.

 

Unit 4: The Cell

Module 20: What is a Cell?

  • Compare and contrast the main characteristics of animal and plant cells.
  • Compare and contrast the main characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Describe the functions of cellular structures possessed by all cells.
  • Describe the main components of the eukaryotic cell and their functions.
  • Identify examples of improper use of antibiotics.
  • List the basic tenets of cell theory.
  • Predict and explain the consequences of misuse or overuse of antibiotics.
  • Recognize that antibiotics are only effective against bacteria and do not affect human body cells or viruses.

 

Module 21: The Cell Membrane

  • Compare and contrast the cell membranes of archaeans and other cells.
  • Describe the functional significance of the unique cell membrane found in archaeans.
  • Describe two properties of phospholipid membranes.
  • Discuss the functions of the plasma membrane.
  • Explain why fluidity is an essential property of biological membranes.
  • Identify the components of cellular membranes and discuss the function(s) of each.
  • List the functions of membrane proteins.

 

Module 22: Membrane Transport

  • Compare and contrast active and passive transport proteins.
  • Define diffusion.
  • Define facilitated diffusion and describe the role of channels or pores in facilitated diffusion.
  • Define osmosis.
  • Describe endocytosis and exocytosis as a means of moving materials across the membrane.
  • Discuss the functions of the plasma membrane.
  • Explain how a malfunctioning membrane transporter can result in the disruption of normal bodily function.
  • Identify and discuss cellular responses to hypertonic, hypotonic, and isotonic solutions.
  • List the functions of membrane proteins.
  • Predict whether molecules and ions will pass easily through biological membranes based on their size, polarity, and formal charge.

 

Unit 5: Metabolism

Module 24: Unit Introduction

  • Compare and contrast photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and fermentation.
  • Describe the flow of energy in biological systems.

 

Module 25: Energy

  • Define energy and describe the different types of energy.
  • Describe how ATP transfers energy from catabolic to anabolic pathways.
  • Describe the flow of energy in biological systems.
  • Distinguish between catabolic and anabolic pathways and recognize specific examples of each.
  • Explain why the hydrolysis of ATP releases energy to accomplish cellular work.
  • Identify heat as a form of energy released during all energy transformations.
  • Recognize the difference between ATP and ADP, in terms of both structure and energy.

 

Module 26: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

  • Compare and contrast photosynthesis and cellular respiration.
  • Compare and contrast photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and fermentation.
  • Describe how pigments of different colors interact with light and identify the function of diverse pigments in photosynthetic organisms.
  • Describe metabolic pathways as stepwise chemical transformations either requiring or releasing energy, and recognize conserved themes in these pathways.
  • Identify heat as a form of energy released during all energy transformations.
  • Identify the inputs and outputs for cellular respiration.
  • Identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis.
  • Identify the role of chlorophyll and chloroplasts in photosynthesis.
  • Identify the types of organisms that are capable of photosynthesis.
  • List compartments in eukaryotic cells where photosynthesis takes place.

 

Module 27: Pathways and Regulation

  • Apply knowledge of energy metabolism to the problem of obesity.
  • Describe metabolic pathways as stepwise chemical transformations either requiring or releasing energy, and recognize conserved themes in these pathways.
  • Each enzyme within the pathway is specific to one reaction. The direction of the arrows indicate that this pathway is an anabolic, or synthetic, pathway where complex biomolecules D and F are synthesized using the simpler molecule A as starting material. The coordinated effort of many enzymes can produce a variety of final products.
  • Evaluate the effects of different factors (substrate and enzyme availability, presence of inhibitors) on a given metabolic pathway.
  • Give examples showing how disordered regulation of metabolic pathways can cause disease.
  • This pathway shows the production of the end product “D” from the starting substrate “A.” In this reaction, A is the substrate of enzyme 1,which produces B. Enzyme 2 then uses B as its substrate to produce C. Enzyme3 then uses C as its substrate to produce D.

 

Unit 6: Cell Division

Module 30: Cells and Chromosomes

  • Describe the structure of a chromosome in different stages of the cell cycle.
  • Distinguish between the structure and number of chromosomes in somatic cells, germ cells, and gametes.
  • Explain the functional differences between somatic cells and gametes.
  • Explain why somatic cells and gametes are produced using different cell replication processes.
  • Identify the chromatids and centromere of a chromosome and describe their role in cell replication.
  • Relate the phases of the cell cycle to the corresponding cellular events.

 

Module 31: Mitosis

  • Describe the function of mitosis.
  • List the stages of mitosis and describe what happens at each stage.
  • Match a picture of a cell with the stage of mitosis it is in.
  • Predict the number of genes/gene pairs of the progeny cells based on the number of genes of the parental cell.
  • Relate the regulation of the cell cycle to cancer.

 

Module 32: Meiosis

  • Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in regards to their overall functions, steps of the processes, number of progeny cells, and number of genes (haploid vs. diploid).
  • Describe the function of meiosis as it relates to sexual reproduction.
  • Explain how an incorrect separation of homologues or sister chromatids can result in defective gametes.
  • List the stages of meiosis and describe what happens at each stage.
  • Predict the number of genes/gene pairs of the progeny cells based on the number of genes of the parental cell.

 

Unit 7: Classical Genetics

Module 35: Heredity

  • Apply the law of segregation and predict the possible offspring in heredity problems.
  • Conduct a single-gene cross and interpret the results.
  • Contrast dominant and recessive traits.
  • Define the following: gene, chromosome, allele, haploid, diploid.
  • Describe the function of meiosis as it relates to sexual reproduction.
  • Describe the importance of independent assortment.
  • Detail Mendel’s contributions to the field of genetics.
  • Determine possible gametes from various germ cells that go through meiosis (focusing on one gene with two different alleles).
  • Distinguish between phenotype and genotype.
  • Illustrate the relationships between and among the following: protein, phenotype, genotype, DNA.
  • List the stages of meiosis and describe what happens at each stage.
  • Predict the number of genes/gene pairs of the progeny cells based on the number of genes of the parental cell.
  • Predict the outcomes of crosses with two traits and interpret the results.

 

Module 36: Non-Mendelian Inheritance

  • Exemplify traits that are determined by two or more genes (polygenic inheritance).
  • Illustrate, with examples, that both genes and environmental influences are responsible for the characteristics of different organisms.
  • Predict the outcomes of crosses involving codominance.
  • Predict the outcomes of crosses involving incomplete dominance.
  • Predict the outcomes of inheritance problems involving epistatic genes and interpret the results.

 

Module 37: Human Inheritance

  • Analyze inheritance patterns of human traits and disorders.
  • Analyze the information in a pedigree to determine the mechanism of inheritance (autosomal/sex-linked, recessive/dominant).
  • Compare the terms dominant, recessive, autosomal, and sex-linked.
  • Describe how sex is determined in humans and other organisms.
  • Determine genotypes and phenotypes of possible offspring in crosses involving sex-linked traits.
  • Determine possible genotypes of individuals symbolized in a pedigree.
  • Explain how errors in meiosis can result in aneuploidy.

 

Unit 8: Molecular Genetics

Module 40: DNA Function

  • Compare and contrast PCR and DNA replication.
  • Describe how DNA stores genetic information.
  • For DNA replication: identify molecular requirements, specify cellular location, and predict product.
  • List the steps of PCR, and describe what happens in each step.
  • Recognize who discovered DNA and the experimental results that lead to the discovery.
  • Relate the cellular location of DNA and RNA to their function.
  • Transfer use of PCR amplification of tandem repeats to other applications, such as paternity.

 

Module 41: Gene Expression

  • Classify mutations in the protein coding region of a gene based on their effect on amino acid sequence.
  • Compare and contrast DNA replication, PCR, and transcription.
  • Define the central dogma of molecular biology, and identify its exceptions.
  • Describe the distinct roles each of the three types of RNA play during translation.
  • Describe the link between DNA and visible traits.
  • Explain transcription: identify molecular requirements, specify cellular location, and predict product.
  • Explain translation: identify molecular requirements, specify cellular location, and predict product.
  • Explain why a mutation in the BRCA gene leads to increased risk of cancer.
  • Predict how mistakes during DNA replication, transcription, and translation affect the cell.

 

Module 42: Gene Regulation

  • Describe (identify) three types of interactions between environment and genes that can affect phenotype.
  • Describe how DNA is packaged in a eukaryotic cell and how the packaging changes during the cell cycle.
  • Describe the role of CRP protein in regulation of the lactose operator by glucose.
  • Distinguish among the terms gene, allele, mutation, DNA, chromosome, and genome.
  • Distinguish between prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes.
  • Explain the role of each genetic element in the operon, and correctly order DNA control elements in an operon.
  • Identify the functions of the key parts of a protein-coding gene.
  • Predict under which conditions the repressor protein will bind to its operator sequence.

 

Module 43: Biotechnology

  • Be able to predict which restriction sites are required on the end of the synthetic gene to allow insertion into the expression plasmid.
  • Describe the role of each DNA segment in the expression plasmid in protein production.
  • Design a synthetic gene with the correct codon optimization.
  • Explain the overall process of generating expression plasmids that can produce proteins in bacteria.
  • Predict fragments generated from a DNA sequence after digestion with restriction enzymes.
  • Utilize a codon table to back-translate a given protein sequence.

 

Unit 9: Evolution

Module 45: Unit Introduction: Evolution

  • Compare and contrast pre-existing traditions to current scientific concepts developed by Charles Darwin and others.
  • Describe how the following concepts are interrelated: natural selection, adaptive trait, and adaptation.
  • Recognize that evolution occurs at the population (not individual) level over generations of time.
  • State the modern theory of biological evolution, emphasizing the long history of life on Earth, common ancestry, and natural selection.

 

Module 46: Microevolution

  • Define gene pool and microevolution and demonstrate how the two are related.
  • Define mutation, genetic drift, and gene flow. Recognize and identify examples of each and predict their consequences for a population.
  • Define selection as a mechanism of microevolution; compare and contrast natural selection, sexual selection, and artificial selection.
  • List and explain some applications of the principles of microevolution in modern medicine.

 

Module 47: Macroevolution

  • Compare and contrast allopatric and sympatric speciation.
  • Compare microevolution to macroevolution and recognize the continuity of these processes.
  • Define biological lineage; identify the components of a biological lineage.
  • Define homologous feature. Describe evidence for the relatedness of living organisms, including distantly and closely related species.
  • Define speciation and clade. Recognize the connection between taxonomic groups and clades.
  • Interpret a phylogenetic tree diagram; identify ancestors, evolutionary events, clades, and close vs. distant relatives on a tree diagram.
  • Recognize how evolutionary thinking can contribute to our understanding of human health conditions and help us develop new therapies.

 

Unit 10: Ecology

Module 49: Unit Introduction: What is Ecology?

  • Define ecology and identify its major levels of study from individual to biosphere.

 

Module 50: Populations

  • Apply principles of population ecology to practical problems including pest control, endangered species conservation, and fisheries management.
  • Define limiting factor and recognize that some populations tend to limit themselves.
  • Define population and use sample data to calculate population size, population density, and per capita rates of birth and death.
  • Identify a graph of exponential growth and distinguish it from linear growth.
  • Recognize a graph of logistic population growth and define carrying capacity.
  • Recognize the many sources of variability in population sizes over time and distinguish models from data in studies of population ecology.
  • Use birth and death rates to calculate the rate of increase of a population and apply this to predict numeric growth in a population over a single time step.

 

Module 51: Communities

  • Define and recognize likely examples of mutualism, competition, and predation (including parasitism).
  • Define and recognize likely examples of symbiosis.
  • Define and recognize species richness as a measurement of community health and diversity.
  • Define ecological community and describe how a community’s membership is determined.
  • Define indirect interaction and identify examples of indirect interactions between species in communities.
  • Define interspecific interaction and summarize relationships between species based on their direct effects on each other.
  • Use the keystone species concept to predict or explain the effects on community diversity when a keystone species is eliminated from an ecosystem.

 

Module 52: Ecosystems

  • Compare and contrast the water, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in terms of their major driving processes and abiotic reservoirs.
  • Define biogeochemical cycle and apply the concept of conservation of matter to chemical cycling in ecosystems.
  • Define trophic levels in an ecosystem
  • Describe how the levels of an energy pyramid correspond to the trophic levels of a food chain.
  • Distinguish between a food chain and a food web
  • Distinguish between producers, consumers, detritivores, and decomposers; recognize their roles within ecosystems
  • Distinguish between the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) components of an ecosystem.
  • Explain how energy flows through an ecosystem.
  • Identify important human influences on the water, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles.
  • Recognize that energy flows through ecosystems while chemicals are continuously recycled.

 

Module 53: Human Impact

  • Define and identify renewable versus nonrenewable resources; define and identify biodegradable versus nonbiodegradable materials.
  • Define anthropogenic global climate change.
  • Define biodiversity and list or identify benefits humans derive from biological diversity.
  • Define sustainable technology and identify practices as sustainable or unsustainable based on long-term consequences for people and the environment.
  • Describe or graph how the global human population size has changed over time, identifying the roles of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions.
  • Describe some ecosystem consequences of global climate change.
  • Explain the greenhouse effect as it relates to climate change.
  • Identify some changes that may help to limit future impacts of humans on the environment, including strategies to deal with global climate change.
  • Identify the main human activities that have contributed to increased levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
  • Identify three major factors that promote a large human impact on our environment.
  • List and identify examples of the four major threats to biodiversity in the modern world.
  • Provide and identify examples of evidence for recent warming and global climate change.
  • Recognize examples of human impacts on the environment and match them to the following categories: physical disturbance, resource depletion, or pollution.
  • Summarize projections of future growth in terms of human population size, affluence, and technology.

Course outline

UNIT 1: Biology: The Science of Life

Module 1: Course Introduction

Module 2: Introduction to Biology

Module 3: Themes in Biology

Module 4: Scientific Inquiry

Module 5: Unit Summary: Biology – The Science of Life

 

UNIT 2: Introduction to Chemistry

Module 6: Unit Introduction: Introduction to Chemistry

Module 7: Atoms

Module 8: Chemical Bonds

Module 9: Water

Module 10: Acids and Bases

Module 11: Unit Summary: Introduction to Chemistry

 

UNIT 3: Biological Macromolecules

Module 12: Unit Introduction: Biological Macromolecules

Module 13: Introduction to Organic Molecules

Module 14: Carbohydrates

Module 15: Lipids

Module 16: Proteins

Module 17: Nucleic Acids

Module 18: Unit Summary: Biological Macromolecules

 

UNIT 4: The Cell

Module 19: Unit Introduction: The Cell

Module 20: What is a Cell?

Module 21: The Cell Membrane

  • Quiz: Cell Membrane

Module 22: Membrane Transport

Module 23: Unit Summary: The Cell

 

UNIT 5: Metabolism

Module 24: Unit Introduction

Module 25: Energy

Module 26: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

Module 27: Pathways and Regulation

Module 28: Unit Summary: Metabolism

 

UNIT 6: Cell Division

Module 29: Unit Introduction: Cell Division

Module 30: Cells and Chromosomes

Module 31: Mitosis

Module 32: Meiosis

Module 33: Unit Summary: Cell Division

 

UNIT 7: Classical Genetics

Module 34: Unit Introduction: Classical Genetics

Module 35: Heredity

Module 36: Non-Mendelian Inheritance

Module 37: Human Inheritance

Module 38: Unit Summary: Classical Genetics

 

UNIT 8: Molecular Genetics

Module 39: Unit Introduction: Molecular Genetics

Module 40: DNA Function

Module 41: Gene Expression

Module 42: Gene Regulation

Module 43: Biotechnology

Module 44: Unit Summary: Molecular Genetics

 

UNIT 9: Evolution

Module 45: Unit Introduction: Evolution

Module 46: Microevolution

Module 47: Macroevolution

Module 48: Unit Summary: Evolution

 

UNIT 10: Ecology

Module 49: Unit Introduction: What is Ecology?

Module 50: Populations

Module 51: Communities

Module 52: Ecosystems

Module 53: Human Impact

Module 54: Unit Summary: Ecology

 

UNIT 11: Appendix

Module 55: Appendix

Other course details

This course is comparable to one semester of a general education biology course at a community college.

August, 2012

Portions of this course are built on materials developed and generously provided by University of Maryland University College, made available with permission under a CC-BY-NClicense. Direct use of specific activities and media elements are noted throughout the course.

Development Team

The development and ongoing improvement of an OLI course is always a collaborative effort, built on the time, talent and commitment of many individuals. This OLI Biology Course is no exception.

Thank you to the following contributors:

Course Authors: Affiliation
Ana Marie Barral National University
Beth Carpenter University of Maryland University College
Anya Goodman California Polytechnic State University
Jon Hoekstra Heartland Community College
Brian Kram Prince George Community College
Debra McLaughlin University of Maryland University College
Wendy Riggs Redwood Community College
Gordon Rule Carnegie Mellon University
Suzanne Wakim Butte Community College
Kathy Warner University of Maryland University College
Other Contributors: Affiliation
Diana Bajzek Carnegie Mellon University
Norman Bier Carnegie Mellon University
Michaele Brown Carnegie Mellon University
Renee Fisher Carnegie Mellon University
Jim Greeno Carnegie Mellon University
Michelle Meyers Editor
Candace Orsetti University of Maryland University College
Sandy Raysor Carnegie Mellon University
Robin Searles-Adenegan University of Maryland University College
Keris Simmonds University of Maryland University College
Cheryl Templeton Carnegie Mellon University
Daniel Williams Winston Salem State University

System requirements

OLI system requirements, regardless of course:

  • internet access
  • an operating system that supports the latest browser update
  • the latest browser update (Chrome recommended; Firefox, Safari supported; Edge and Internet Explorer are supported but not recommended)
  • pop-ups enabled
  • cookies enabled

Some courses include exercises with exceptions to these requirements, such as technology that cannot be used on mobile devices.

This course’s system requirements:

  • none listed (subject to change)
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